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Economic impacts of care by high-volume providers for non-curative esophagogastric cancer: a population-based analysis

Hallet J, Look Hong NJ, Zuk V, Davis LE, Gupta V, Earle CC, Mittmann N, Coburn NG. Gastric Cancer. 2020; 23(3):373-81. Epub 2019 Dec 13. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10120-019-01031-w


Background — Esophagogastric cancer (EGC) is one of the deadliest and costliest malignancies to treat. Care by high-volume providers can provide better outcomes for patients with EGC. Cost implications of volume-based cancer care are unclear. We examined the cost-effectiveness of care by high-volume medical oncology providers for non-curative management of EGC.

Methods — We conducted a population-based cohort study of non-curative EGC over 2005-2017 by linking administrative datasets. High-volume was defined as ≥ 11 patients/provider/year. Healthcare costs ($USD/patient/month-survived) were computed from diagnosis to death or end of follow-up from the perspective of the healthcare system. Multivariable quantile regression examined the association between care by high-volume providers and costs. Sensitivity analyses were conducted by varying costing horizons and high-volume definitions.

Results — Among 7011 non-curative EGC patients, median overall survival was superior with care by high-volume providers with 7.0 (IQR 3.3-13.3) compared to 5.9 (IQR 2.6-12.1) months (p < 0.001) for low-volume providers. Median costs/patient/month-lived were lower for high-volume providers ($5518 vs. $5911; p < 0.001), owing to lower inpatient acute care costs, despite higher medication-associated and radiotherapy costs. Care by high-volume providers was independently associated with a reduction of $599 per patient/month-lived (95% confidence interval - 966 to - 331) compared to low-volume providers. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was - 393. Care by high-volume providers remained the dominant strategy when varying the costing horizon and the high-volume definition.

Conclusion — Care by high-volume providers for non-curative EGC is associated with superior survival and lower healthcare costs, indicating a dominant strategy that may provide an opportunity to improve cost-effectiveness of care delivery.

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