Skip to main content

A population-based cohort study of the impact of infectious complications requiring hospitalization after prostate biopsy on radical prostatectomy surgical outcomes

Olvera-Posada D, Welk B, McClure JA, Winick-Ng J, Izawa JI, Pautler SE. Urology. 2018; 121:139-46. Epub 2018 Aug 29.


Objective —To compare radical prostatectomy outcomes in men with and without exposure to a major infectious event within 30-days of a prior TRUS-biopsy.

Materials and Methods — This retrospective cohort study included men who underwent radical prostatectomy from 2002 to 2013 in Ontario, Canada. Several linked administrative databases were used. Exposure was defined as hospitalization with evidence of a urinary tract infection or sepsis during the first 30-days after a prostate biopsy. The primary outcome was a composite of procedures indicative of a likely serious complication of radical prostectomy within the first 12 months after surgery. Secondary outcomes included oncological, functional, and hospital related events within 2 years of radical prostatectomy.

Results — A total of 26,254 patients were included in this study and 530 (2.02%) had a post-TRUS-biopsy infection. A similar proportion of patients with and without a post-TRUS-biopsy infectious event experienced the composite primary outcome (1.7% vs 1.1%; OR 1.61, 95% CI 0.82-3.14; = .16). However, exposed patients had significantly higher odds of perioperative blood transfusion (OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.30-2.00; <.001), bladder neck contracture (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.12-1.63; P = .002), and 30-day hospital readmission (OR 2.08, 95% CI 1.47-2.95; <.001), and a small but significant increase in length of hospital stay (= 0.005). No other significant differences were observed.

Conclusion — Although prior infectious events are associated with increased risk of blood transfusion, bladder neck contracture, and hospital readmission following radical prostatectomy, results from this study suggest that major surgical complications, are not adversely affected by TRUS-biopsy related infections.

×